100 Stone Village Drive, Suite 102

Fort Mill, SC 29708

Phone 980-404-2365

Fax 803-403-8916

What To Expect

How does therapy help?

Depending on your present situation and your reasons for seeking help, there are many benefits to therapy. If you are seeking diagnosis or treatment for a mental illness, therapy can help you better manage your symptoms, outbreaks, and triggers. It can also offer you increased coping skills and open your eyes to new ways of dealing with situations that you may not have been aware of before. Therapy can offer problem-solving skills, provide support, and help you work through life changes, allowing you to see your circumstances as a personal growth opportunity instead of a burden or obstacle.

Some specific skills therapy can provide are:

  1. Emotional management, including, but not limited to anger, jealousy, grief, and depression.
  2. Coping mechanisms to allow you to work through situations which typically cause you anxiety, fear, or avoidance.
  3. Stress-management techniques to apply to deal with stress within your everyday life, such as with your job and family.
  4. Skills and techniques to help you better navigate relationships, or to work through relationship troubles.
  5. Problem solving skills for you to enact when you encounter issues which may typically have caused you to shy away or back down, such as social situations or public speaking.
  6. Improving self-love, self-confidence, and body image.
  7. Improving communication, listening, and the ability to speak up for yourself.
  8. Understanding your own skills, strengths, and positive attributes and learning to quiet your inner negative critique.
  9. Finding a resolution to the issues that originally led you to therapy, such as having panic attacks, or being unable to sleep.

While the decision to begin therapy is an individual choice, in many regards it may be helpful for everyone. There are a wide variety of reasons to begin therapy ranging from a diagnosed mental illnesses to help managing daily stress or a transitional period of your life. It is your treatment plan that will vary based on your individual circumstances.



Our office has a two step intake process


1. REVIEW DOCUMENTATION AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

Your first meeting will be with an intake specialist who will review referral documents, intake paperwork, program options, insurance, and payment responsibilities. The specialist will match you with a therapist, refer to an appropriate level of care or enroll you in an education program.



2. START YOUR PROGRAM OR COMPLETE THERAPY INTAKE

Your first session with the therapist will be more like a two-way interview. They will get to know you, and you’ll get to know them. Your therapist will ask you questions to help better understand your primary issues and concerns, as well as your history in terms of other events in your life, family, childhood, and career. If there is a mental health diagnosis such as depression or anxiety your therapist will review the criteria with you and possible treatment options within the practice or an outside source.



As a general rule, all therapy sessions are confidential and anything you discuss with your therapist will remain between the two of you unless you request otherwise. This is as per protection rules by law, which all therapists legally need to follow, and no information from the session can be disclosed without prior written consent from the client.


There are exceptions to this law, however, and the therapist can disclose information from the session to legal authorities or appointed persons if any of the following are true:


  1. The therapist suspects abuse to a child, dependent adult, or an elder, or is made aware of domestic abuse. These situations all require the therapist to notify law authorities immediately.
  2. If the therapist suspects an individual has caused or is threatening to cause severe bodily harm to another person, therapists are required to report it to the police.
  3. If an individual intends to harm himself or herself, express to the therapist for example, plans for suicide. While the therapist will attempt to work through this in the therapy session if it appears to be unresolved or the client does not cooperate, additional action may need to be taken to ensure the safety of the client.